Diversity and inclusion in the workplace are crucial for a successful future workforce. A focus on data can provide insights and solutions HR leaders are looking for.

In my last post, we explored how people analytics can aid workforce planning. Today, I’ll delve into diversity in the workplace and what can be improved with a focus on data.

Firstly, I want to recognize and remind that employee diversity is more than data points to be assessed and a box to be ticked. But if you don’t know the what of current and past employees, you can’t make the right decisions for the future workforce.

And you won’t know the what until data is leveraged for a baseline. Here are three big questions around diversity in the workplace and suggested data points to measure.

What factors can we measure to assess diversity and inclusion with our current employee population? 

Diversity in the workplace comes in many forms—age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, gender, abilities and more. But these identities are just the tip of the iceberg. Diversity and inclusion efforts don’t stop at the hiring and signing of a contract. The positive progress under the surface comes from the employee experience—from the hire throughout the employee’s entire time at the company.

Three key data points to consider and measure: 

  • What is the percentage of diversity hires (by role level)?
  • What percentage of diversity hires have been a part of overall attrition?
  • What percentage of diversity hires were promoted in the last year?

Have diversity and inclusion employee groups helped to foster a more diverse culture and workplace? 

I’m particularly proud to work for Accenture because of its award-winning  initiatives and commitment to a diverse and inclusive culture. The question companies must always ask in any engagement area, but especially with diversity is “what can be done better?” Growth and enrollment of D&I groups can indicate overall positive progress.

Three key data points to consider and measure:

  • How many new D&I employee groups have formed within the last year?
  • What percentage of diversity hires are in D&I employee groups?
  • What percentage of non-diverse hires are in D&I employee groups?

What initiatives are the best for making people feel included at work and in their teams? 

Engagement initiatives for employees are a huge component of D&I. If you look at how long an employee stays at a company, this is often an indicator of their feeling of inclusion.

Three key data points to consider and measure:

  • Time at company of individuals in a mentor/mentee relationship with someone from a different background vs. in a mentor/mentee relationship with someone from the same background.
  • Time at company of individuals in a diversity and inclusion group vs. not in a D&I group.
  • Time at company of individuals who report to someone from a different background vs. report to someone with the same background.

As I mentioned at the beginning of this post, diversity and inclusion are more than just a check mark. These data points can provide insights into hiring, attrition, employee longevity and the overall employee experience.

My next post will cover people analytics to help with recruitment initiatives. Until then, contact me here or connect with my colleague Colin Strasburg for more information on how to get started with your people analytics journey.

You can more about Accenture’s Getting to Equal research here.

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