How to prepare HR for a successful digital transformation

While digital transformation is at the top of every organization’s agenda, HR tends to lag behind, according to Steffen Maier, cofounder of Impraise. In this HR Daily Advisor blog post, he details four ways to prepare your HR team for a successful culture and digital transformation: 1. Create end-to-end responsibility, where digital transformation comes from the people with the authority to successfully drive it. 2. Remember, data beats hierarchy. Rather than picking and choosing the data that supports what the leadership is looking for, allow it to inform decision-making. 3. Use data to be strategic, not just reactive. “People analytics isn’t just about reporting this year’s turnover rate,” Maier writes. “If HR can learn to collect and make use of people data, it will have a powerful force behind the initiatives it presents to the executive level.” 4. Don’t focus on hiring digital talent. Help your internal HR team develop new digital skills. “Instead of holding HR back, digital transformation should be an opportunity to empower the department with valuable workforce insights. New HR tools provide support for the latter, but revamping the traditional HR mind-set should be the first step in your transformation journey,” Maier concludes.

Using big data to build a talent pipeline

Speaking of the participants at last week’s HR Tech Conference, this HR Executive piece highlights our presentation, where Accenture’s Mike Gabour talked about using big data to build a robust talent pipeline. “Gone are the days when you had 10 years to respond to a new tech trend. These days you’ll be lucky if you get two,” he said. We partnered with Burning Glass Technologies to explore the larger world of human-capital data to get answers to questions like: How do we validate what we’re seeing internally? How do we make sure we’re not missing what’s happening in the external marketplace? And how do we look to the next one to two years and predict what the future trends will be? With data Burning Glass collects from 50,000 sources, and with the nearly 1 billion jobs in its database going back to 2010, we were able to see job skills in context. We could also make appropriate comparisons between two companies in the same industry, in order to get an accurate look at the companies’ “talent shape” and see what types of skills they are looking for. This information allows companies to identify future skills gaps and how to invest in future learning, as well as where to focus on hiring. “Using this information can really help inform our decisions and prioritize those investments we need to make on a quarterly or annual basis,” Gabour said at the conference.

HR Tech Conference highlights

In this ERE blog post, Joel Cheesman shares the four key takeaways from the HR Tech Conference held in Las Vegas last week. 1. Business is good. “For an industry that thrives when the economy is good and literally falls apart when things go south, the conference was proof that the economic party is alive and well,” he writes. 2. Apps 2.0 is here. Cheesman says HR companies are reaching beyond Facebook and Twitter and are leveraging a new generation of platforms. 3. Chatbots are for real. “I’ve called them commodities, but for now business looks good for the chatbot players,” he writes. “Automation is in.” 4. Who wasn’t there was very telling. Cheesman believes the absence of Glasdoor, Facebook, Google, LinkedIn and Slack indicates the event was more focused on partnerships, instead of sales.

Immersive learning as the future of employee training

“The next generation of workers are children of the digital age and used to constant stimulation across all forms of technology. We need to consider: how can we motivate our new hires and existing employees in the right direction?” writes Sue Turk in this Human Resources Director blog post. She believes immersive learning, the kind that combines virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) technologies, has the potential to be the most effective with the younger generation of workers. “Virtual immersive learning is fairly out of the norm compared to traditional training methods, and helps employees feel more open-minded and willing to try the experience,” she writes. “It can also have more of a long-lasting effect than traditional training methods–it becomes more of a memorable and a personal experience for the individual, allowing them to retain information easier.”

11 ways AI can revolutionize HR

Members of the Forbes Human Resources Council were recently asked what the future of artificial intelligence (AI) in HR might look like. This article sums up the top 11 ways in which AI is changing the human resources game, according to HR experts across industries: 1. Automate business processes, 2. Enhance efficiency, 3. Reduce bias, 4. Narrow the talent pipeline, 5. Replace administrative tasks, 6. Communicate candidate status, 7. Simplify sourcing, 8. Reduce administrative load, 9. Highlight better talent, 10. Enhance the human experience, 11. Stay compliant. “The answers all pointed to systems that were operating more smoothly and HR professionals getting a fighting chance at doing their jobs better instead of chasing a never-ending paper trail,” the article notes.

Three HR tech trends to watch

This TalentCulture blog acknowledges the recent proliferation of HR tech tools in the marketplace and flags three hot trends worthy of following: 1. Better people analytics to target HR communications more effectively, as well as to identify high-potential employees and what they want from employers. 2. Employee self-service (EES) tools that enable employees to complete basic HR tasks on their own from their mobile devices. 3. Social collaboration tools such as chat rooms, instant messaging and video communication to streamline onboarding and give employees a sense of community. “Growth-minded companies are empowering their people with new tools to solicit and provide real-time feedback, build success recognition into the fabric of the culture and ensure that both managers and employees have the resources they need to innovate, grow and perform at their best,” Rajeev Behera, founder of Reflektive told TalentCulture.

The next generation of HR service

According to George Zarkadakis, delivering HR services to employees is like an ambulance – not something one thinks of every day, but essential when needed. In a Willis Towers Watson Wire post, he explains why the next generation of HR services must be responsive, proactive and agile. “Because HR services is often regarded as a cost center, the aim has usually been to reduce costs, often at the expense of reengineering the process to make it more efficient,” Zarkadakis writes. He recommends introducing new data portals and platforms to help HR deliver a more responsive and personalized service; utilizing virtual assistants and chatbots to streamline the front desk experience. “These next generation technologies offer an enormous opportunity to reinvent HR service delivery at the back end as well as the front. [HR leaders] can get themselves out of the passenger seat and start navigating the HR ambulance using GPS, saying goodbye to the backstreets of confusion forever,” Zarkadakis writes.

How to ensure employees adopt HR tech

This HR Technologist blog post highlights five ways to streamline the transition to new technologies and avoid change resistance by the workforce. 1. Talk before you purchase: Healthy communication is key to keeping the workforce in the loop. 2. Keep it simple: Training must be relatable, lucid and broken down into clear action points. 3. Ensure opinion leaders are with you on the migration: Influencers are the flag-bearers for the transformation and will help build enthusiasm for new programs. 4. Action a communication plan at every level: For a smooth transition, consider regular meetings and reviews. 5. Insist on feedback and save space for flexibility: An open mind-set helps familiarize employees with the solution. “With these ideas in implementation, a transition pattern could become far easier, with room to determine adoption figures, study resistance and its causes, and focus on insightful transformation trajectories,” the article notes.

Chatbots, a must in HR tech

Artificial intelligence and cognitive computing are no longer just options for HR, but rather a must, argues Meghan Biro in this TalentCulture blog post. “Chatbots on company websites and social media channels will be a boon for attracting far more talent and then helping turn that talent from passive into active candidates,” she writes. “In terms of talent management, the possibilities are endless, from onboarding to management. If you don’t have it, you’re going to get left behind.” Biro cites the results of a survey by the IBM Institute for Business Value, which found that 65 percent of CEOs expect cognitive computing to drive significant value in HR. She points to the U.S. Army’s chatbot SGT STAR as an example of how the trend is gaining ground. Biro also believes that HR tech can help create a more diverse workforce: “We can learn to overcome bias, unconscious or otherwise, by using technology and analytics to teach us what we’re doing right and what we can do better.”